Shadowing: Week 3

23 Jul

A cardiothoracic surgery to remove masses from the lung amazed me by not only the coordination of the surgeons, but their ability to use imaging and touch.  The patient was ventilated as needed for the doctors to reduce the size of the lung tissue to see around inside the chest.   Seeing the wounds closed with preloaded rows of staples was an “aha” moment for me.

Angiography of an aneurysm in a cerebral artery.  Source: Wikipedia.

Angiography of an aneurysm in a cerebral artery. Source: Wikipedia.

Wednesday morning: oncology.  The patient had previously had their cancerous gallbladder removed by laproscopy, but the margins came back still positive for cancer.  Today the surgeons had to open the patient to take out part of the liver.  A row of staples won’t work in this case.  Cautery, fibrin laced mesh and a tissue gel all helped seal the remaining organ.

Last shift of the week, Friday afternoon to evening.  The neurosurgeons had an aneurism to clip.  By the time I arrived the right temporal and meninges had already been reflected.  The angiogram was displayed on video screens in the operating room.  Doppler was used to “hear” if the clipped vessel was completely closed.   Before they closed the skull I noted to myself that the brain does not appear as impressive as its many functions truly are, and I don’t think I could be a neurosurgeon.  Not due to the physical talents necessary, but for the mental risks involved.

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