HAPS in Italy Starts Next Week!!!

Buongiorno a tutti!!!

On Sunday, July 6, a total of 28 anatomists will convene in Italy for Anatomia Italiana 2014. This summer marks the third year of a program Connecting Art and Anatomy. We will visit the world’s oldest anatomy theaters at universities in Padua and Bologna. We will examine 250 year-old wax anatomical sculptures that are works of art in their own right at the University of Florence. Renaissance masterpieces in Rome, Florence, and Venice will be considered from a fresh perspective: Did the artists and sculptors of 15th and 16th centuries conduct human dissection to enhance their art?

More of us are incorporating cultural concepts into our classes, and this lived experience provides the underpinnings for such interdisciplinary endeavors. Indeed, this entire experience is intended to enrich the teaching and learning of our colleagues and their students.

The diversity of this year’s group demonstrates how these ideas are spreading. Participants are coming from as far away as Qatar and New Zealand! A variety of professionals are enrolling too: scientific illustrators, oil portrait artists, and midwives are seeing the value of Connecting Art and Anatomy.

Some folks enrolled in the HAPS-I course option, and are getting graduate credit. Just this week we finished the last of our Skype sessions discussing journal articles exploring the history of anatomy in Italy, and the role of anatomy in Renaissance art. In just a few days we will go beyond the books, and live the history. Click here for more information about the HAPS-I course option.

If you like, you can follow us while abroad. I plan to utilize social media on a daily basis. You can follow Anatomia Italiana on Instagram @Anatomia_Italiana; on Twitter @AnatomiaItalian (notice the subtle difference in spelling), or on Facebook at facebook.com/AnatomiaItaliana. I will be using the hashtags: #HAPSinItaly and #AnatomiaItaliana2014

If this whole social media thing is too much for you, no worries as I will also post to this blog on a weekly basis. No matter the medium, it will be fun and instructive to keep an eye on your HAPS colleagues as we stand in the room William Harvey dissected, and before the lecture podium of Galileo. And my apologies in advance for the photos of fresh pasta, fine wine, and the Chianti countryside!

Buona giornata, e ci sentiamo presto,

Kevin Petti, Ph.D.
San Diego Miramar College

 

Arrivederci Italia!

IMG_2596Salve i miei colleghi!

In my previous post about Anatomia Italiana 2013 our group had just visited the La Specola anatomical wax museum at the University of Florence. Since then we visited two other collections of anatomical waxes, and the historic anatomy theater at the University of Bologna. Present here also are Luigi Galvani’s tools for his neurophysiology experiments. Amazing! Pictured above, Prof. Alessandro Ruggeri discusses the historic collection of specimens at the Luigi Cattaneo Museum, which is in the present anatomy department at the University of Bologna.

Once we moved onto to a four day stay in Venice, we took a brief train ride for a day visit to the University of Padau. Here we got to see the oldest permanent anatomy theatre (1595), the location of anatomic study by the likes of William Harvey. Was it here that Harvey entertained his first thoughts on the nature of the circulatory system? An added bonus was to sit within the lecture hall of Galileo, and stand before his podium.

The sense of history that our group experienced was personally rewarding, and truly a professional development exercise. We often shared ideas on how to incorporate what we learned on this venture into our classes.

Anatomia Italian 2013 concluded this weekend after two weeks in Italy. Most of us have returned home by now, while a few in the group extended their stay in Europe. All of us, however,  will never forget our journey back in time to the venues where anatomy as a science in medical education began.

The exciting idea about all of this is that in 2014 HAPS members can participate in Anatomia Italiana and also enroll in a three-unit HAPS-I course. A month of online readings prior to the travel experience, followed by the submission of a teaching element after a visit to Italy is the essence of the course. If the 2014 HAPS-I Anatomia Italiana course is something you are considering, you can download the syllabus by clicking here. Details are also on the HAPS-I registration page, which can be visited by clicking here. The entire travel program can be reviewed at the Anatomia Italiana webpage. Keep in mind that it is also an option to travel with Anatomia Italiana and not enroll in the HAPS-I course.

IMG_2709Buona giornata, e ci vediamo a presto,

Kevin Petti, Ph.D.
San Diego Miramar College

Buongiorno da Italia!

Salve i miei colleghi!

FLO_1635I am writing this post from Florence as Anatomia Italiana 2013 is near half way completed. HAPS members Ellen Arnestad, Dic Charge, Caryl Tickner, Cris Martin, Shery Medler, Kathy Tyner, Heidi Pearson, Mark Neilsen, and yours truly, have spent the last eight days in Rome and Florence. As many of you know, the ancient history, Renaissance art, and culinary experiences are overwhelming. But, the most unique aspect of our time in Italy has been our visits to venues important to the history of anatomy education.

In Rome we visited the National Museum of the Sanitary Arts in one of Europe’s oldest hospitals, Santo Spirito in Sassia. There we were greeted by Prof. Gaspare Baggieri who lectured about the role of that institution in early medical education and research. He also shared with us medical tools and alchemy instruments that dated back over 500 years. And today in Florence we visited the La Specola anatomical wax museum at the University of Florence, as well as the Basilica of Santo Spirito to see the crucifix Michelangelo carved at 17 in gratitude for access to corpses for dissection.

We look forward to our visits to the University of Bologna and the University of Padua where we will visit important anatomical wax museums as well as historic anatomy theaters. I will be sure to post a photo and a few words about those experiences.

Connecting art and science is integral to this experience, and many of us are discussing (over wine and pasta!) how we are going to enhance our classes by incorporating the concepts developed during Anatomia Italiana.

The exciting idea about all of this is that in 2014 HAPS members can participate in Anatomia Italiana and also enroll in a three-unit HAPS-I course. A month of online readings prior to the travel experience, followed by the submission of a teaching element after a visit to Italy is the essence of the course. If the 2014 HAPS-I Anatomia Italiana course is something you are considering, you can download the syllabus by clicking here. Details are also on the HAPS-I registration page, which can be visited by clicking here. The entire travel program can be reviewed at the Anatomia Italiana webpage. Keep in mind that it is also an option to travel with Anatomia Italiana and not enroll in the HAPS-I course.

FLO_1679My next post will be from Venice in a few days from now.

Buona giornata, e ci vediamo a presto,

Kevin Petti, Ph.D.
San Diego Miramar College

Study Abroad in Italy with HAPS-I!

Buongiorno a tutti!

This is the second summer I will be taking a group of HAPS members to Italy in a professional education program I call Anatomia Italiana. Many of us share an interest in the early days of anatomy in medical education. It is an amazing experience to visit the centuries old dissection theaters at the University of Padua and the University of Bologna (see HAPS members from Anatomia Italiana 2012  pictured here in Bologna). The wax anatomical collections at the University of Florence are perhaps the most visually compelling artifacts of our discipline.

Connecting anatomy in the early universities with the dissections conducted by the Renaissance masters is another element of Anatomia Italiana. The profound nexus between art and science is best demonstrated by the genius of Michelangelo. Indeed, the wooden crucifix he carved in gratitude for secret access to corpses from a conventʼs hospital still hangs in the Basilica of Santo Spirito in Florence. It is a moving experience to stand before it. Gathering in the room where Leonardo dissected in Rome is quite a moment as well.

While HAPS members (along with anyone interested in connecting art and anatomy) are welcome to visit Italy with me in the future, I am pleased to say that the HAPS Institute (HAPS-I) has approved Anatomia Italiana as a three-credit course for Summer 2014! HAPS members now have the option of also enrolling in a HAPS-I course while traveling with Anatomia Italiana. President Valerie Dean O’Loughlin and Executive Director Peter English have asked me to post a few blogs from Italy during this year’s tour starting Sunday, July 21. Keep an eye out for posts from Rome, Florence and Venice.

If the 2014 HAPS-I Anatomia Italiana course is something you are considering, you can download the syllabus by clicking here. Details are also on the HAPS-I registration page, which can be visited by clicking here. The entire travel program can be reviewed at the Anatomia Italiana webpage. Keep in mind that it is also an option to travel with Anatomia Italiana and not enroll in the HAPS-I course.

I’ll be sure to post a photo or two of the Anatomia Italiana 2013 HAPS members thoughtfully examining historic anatomical specimens. I’ll save the wine tasting and gondola riding photos for another day!

Buona giornata, e ci sentiamo da Roma!

Kevin Petti, Ph.D.
San Diego Miramar College