Nominate Someone for the HAPS/Thieme Excellence in Teaching Award!

Do you know a great teacher,  someone you feel inspires student success in anatomy and physiology?  If you do (and we all do), please consider nominating him or her for the HAPS/ Thieme Excellence in Teaching Award for 2018.  HAPS is honored to team with Thieme Publishers to offer this opportunity to recognize one of our own for efforts in the classroom or laboratory.

Nominated instructors:

  • Must be teaching anatomy and physiology during this academic year, with an expectation that they will continue,
  • Must be HAPS members, and
  • Must be exemplary teachers

To qualify to nominate an instructor, you must be an instructor or administrator at an accredited institution in the United States or Canada, have at least two years of experience, and be able to explain why the nominee deserves the award.

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HAPS expresses its thanks to Thieme Publishing for support in the establishment and continuation of this award.

The award includes a $1500 cash honorarium and waiver of fees for the HAPS Annual Conference.  The recipient will present the “HAPS/Thieme Award for Excellence in Teaching Workshop” during the Annual Conference Workshop Sessions in 2018.  We had terrific workshops at the 2015, 2016 and 2017 conferences.  This year’s recipient will join an illustrious group that includes Terry Thompson, Mary Tracy Bee and Mark Nielsen.

Nomination forms and details on award criteria can be found on the HAPS webpage. Deadline for nominations is December 1st, 2017.

Don Kelly
Co-Chair
HAPS Grants and Scholarships Committee

Gail Jenkins Learning and Mentoring Award

Gail Jenkins was a dynamic teacher and long-time HAPS member.  Gail loved teaching. Most of all, she loved to make difficult concepts in anatomy and physiology easily comprehensible to her students.  To accomplish this, she employed the “Keep is simple, Sweetie” (KISS) approach.  When facing a difficult concept, she’d urge her students to “KISS” it by using everyday analogies or tools to visualize and simplify the subject.  Her students loved this approach.

In Gail’s honor and to keep her memory at HAPS alive, Wiley Publishing, in partnership with HAPS, has established the Gail Jenkins Teaching and Mentoring Award. This prestigious award recognizes a HAPS member who:

  • Uses engaging learning activities to help students comprehend difficult concepts and,
  • Is willing to mentor other instructors in this approach.  

The award includes a $1000 cash award and waiver of the 2018 Annual Conference registration fee. Award recipients will present a workshop during the workshop sessions at the annual conference.

To qualify for the award, applicants must be HAPS members engaged in teaching anatomy and physiology, must provide an explanation of how engaging learning activities are incorporated into their classes, must provide an abstract of a workshop to be presented at the 2018 conference, and must provide a letter of recommendation from a colleague with direct knowledge of the applicant’s teaching and student interaction.  Applicants who can demonstrate a spirit of sharing this approach and mentoring their colleagues will be given preference. 

HAPS expresses its thanks to Wiley Publishing for support in the establishment and continuation of this award.
HAPS expresses its thanks to Wiley Publishing for support in the establishment and continuation of this award.

Applications can be found on the HAPS website.  The application deadline is December 1st.

Don Kelly
HAPS Grants and Scholarships Committee

HAPS Offers Grants and Scholarships!

In 1994 the HAPS Executive Committee initiated a program of modest grants, scholarships, and awards for anatomy and/or physiology faculty and their students. These awards support the mission statement of the Society, which is to promote excellence in the teaching of human anatomy and physiology. Applications for all grants, scholarships, and awards must be submitted online. Links to online applications, eligibility, and additional information can be found on each grant-specific webpage.

The submission deadline for all the scholarships listed below is December 1, 2017. Some of the applications require letters of recommendation, so now is a great time to check them out.

Click on a grant or scholarship to see if you qualify!

The deadline to submit your application for any of the above scholarships is December 1st. So go on and get started!

How does Physical Activity Exert Beneficial Effects on Atherosclerosis and Coronary Artery Disease?

This post describes an update seminar delivered by Harold Laughlin, Professor at the University of Missouri at the 2017 HAPS Annual Conference in Salt Lake City.


Update Seminar VII was given by Harold Laughlin.  In this talk, the benefits of exercise on cardiovascular health were clearly documented.  I’m sure we’ve all heard the sobering stats before.  Cardiovascular disease, largely due to atherosclerosis, is the leading cause of death in the USA, accounting for ~ 1/3rd of all deaths.  As our President-Elect Ron Gerrits announced, we were all left feeling very inspired to getting fit for the HAPS conference Fun Run next year!  

For those interested in a great review article on the regulation of coronary blood flow during exercise, Harold mentioned the Physiology Review article by Duncker and Bache (2008).   In particular, here is list of some of the things we know so far regarding coronary blood flow during exercise:

  • During exercise, heart rate and myocardial contraction increase to meet the increased oxygen demands of the body and heart itself.
  • In order to meet increased metabolic demand, coronary blood flow increases (~5 fold) and there is also a small increase in oxygen extraction.
  • An increase in heart rate, will increase the relative time spent in systole, which affects (impedes) coronary blood flow.
  • There are many factors which regulate coronary vessel dilation (neurohormones, endothelial factors, and myocardial factors)
  • During exercise, coronary vasodilation appears to be induced by many factors including: exercise-induced ischemia, shear stress, increased arterial pressure, tangential wall stress, higher levels of endogenous NO, and β-adrenergic activity.
  • Exercise training results in coronary microvascular adaptations including: the formation of new capillaries, increased arteriolar diameters, increased adrenergic receptor responsiveness, and increased endothelium-dependent vasodilation (as a result of increased expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), increased NO production, and increased Kv (potassium voltage) channel activity).

In his talk, Harold brought up some current data from his experiments with swine vasculature (Simmons et al., 2012).  He noted that healthy individuals typically have good vasomotor tone, and express low levels of the inflammatory markers and adhesion molecules (e.g. E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, VCAM-1) that are associated with atherosclerosis.  It has been previously found that endothelial cells located at bifurcations and other points of turbulence, are more at risk for developing atherosclerotic plaques than straight conduit arteries (Davies et al. 2010).  Laughlin et al. (2012) decided to investigate the straight conduit arteries and veins in six different regions of the swine to determine whether there were any differences in susceptibility to the development of atherosclerosis.  Overall, they found conduit arteries expressed higher levels of both pro- and anti-atherogenic markers than veins.  Also as one might expect, vessels of healthy individuals that lack atherosclerosis, are the most responsive to exercise.

In this talk, the improvements in vasculature as a result of exercise training were specifically addressed (Green et al. 2017).  The exercise-induced effects on vasculature is actually remarkable.  It is estimated that physical activity increases longevity, and reduces the risk of cardiovascular mortality by 42-44%.  The positive effect of exercise is noted to have dose-dependent curve and exercise training has been found to be on par with contemporary drug interventions (Green et al. 2017).  Exercise induces structural and functional adaptations in the vascular walls that reduce the risk of atherosclerotic plaque formation.  In addition increased capillary density and formation of additional collateral circulation is observed, as exercise induces the release of VEGF (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor) (Green et. al. 2017).  Also, exercise was found to increase endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) activity which contributes to the growth of new vessels as well as repair.

It is important to note that exercise training increases cardiac output and oxygen uptake, without increasing mean arterial pressure.  This is because as cardiac output increases, peripheral vasodilation occurs (reducing afterload).  Exercise training improves vasodilation capabilities through structural changes.  During exercise, the increased systolic pressure stimulates vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells to grow and align in response to stress, allowing for greater vasodilation.  In addition, vessel wall stretching induces vasodilation through increased eNOS activity (which produces the vasodilator NO) and activation of Kv channels (which causes smooth muscle cells to hyperpolarize and relax).  In addition, increased blood flow, has been found to increase both acetylcholine and prostacyclin levels which have been shown to induce vasodilation.  Conversely, low levels of shear stress, has been found to increase expression of adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) and reduce levels of the endogenous vasodilator NO (Green et al. 2017).

Thankfully for those of us looking to improve vasodilatory function in our conduit arteries and increase our capillary density, improvements through exercise can be seen in as little as 1-4 weeks of exercise and of course continue with longer training sessions.  So with that in mind, I’ll be sure to grab my running shoes and sign my kids up for sports, as fewer than 30% of females and 50% of males get the recommended 60 minutes 5-7 days/ week of exercise!  Yikes-arama!  Time to unplug and play…

A big thank you to Harold Laughlin for a highly motivating talk!


Post from Dr. Zoë Soon, School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University of British Columbia Okanagan, BC, Canada


Davies, P.F., Civelek, M., Fang, Y., Guerraty, M.A. Passerini, A.G. (2010). Endothelial heterogeneity associated with regional athero-susceptiblity and adaptation to disturbed blood flow in vivo. Semin. Thromb. Hemost. 36, 265-275.

Duncker, D.J. and Bache, R.J. (2008). Regulation of coronary blood flow during exercise. Physiol. Rev. 88, 1009-1086.

Green, D.J., Hopman, M.T.E., Padilla, J., Laughlin, M.H., Thijssen, D.H.J. (2017). Vascular adaptation to exercise in humans: role of hemodynamic stimuli. Phsiol. Rev. 97, 495-528.

Simmons, G.H., Padilla, J., and Laughlin, M.H. (2012). Heterogeneity of endothelial cell phenotype within and amongst conduit vessels of the swine vasculature. Exp. Physiol. 97(9), 1074-1082.

The President’s Medal

The President’s medal is an award that recognizes a HAPS member who has provided exemplary service to HAPS. The recipient of the award is chosen by the current HAPS President and  is announced at the Annual General Membership Meeting.  Terry Thompson explains below why she chose Carol Veil as the 2017 President’s Medal recipient.

Carol Veil (l) receives the President’s Medal from President Terry Thompson (r)

I had the pleasure of presenting this year’s medal to Carol Veil in Salt Lake City.  Because the choice is kept secret, I first shared a “hint” with the audience in the form of a special chocolate Oscar-like statue.  I think most everyone in the room got the hint, except Carol.  In true humility, as she was dutifully taking minutes from the Annual Membership meeting, Carol looked up and thought, “Gee, there must be someone else here that likes chocolate as much as I do”.

Carol served on the Steering Committee as chair of the Curriculum & Instruction Committee from 2005 to 2009.  During that time she coordinated 35 faculty from 18 different states to develop the HAPS Anatomy & Physiology Learning Outcomes, which continues to be one of our organization’s most valuable members resources.  The Learning Outcomes are used by faculty to develop and assess their courses, by publishers to organize textbooks, and by the HAPS Testing Committee to write questions for the HAPS Exam. The coordination and organization of this major project is even more amazing when we think back to the limited technology that was available at that time for collaboration only by email attachments and multiple versions of documents.

In her 19 years as a HAPS member, Carol has given individual and team workshops at 20 annual conferences and at 5 regional conferences, often presenting some of both at the same conference.  Many of us have gleaned new teaching tips and strategies from the various workshops presented in partnership with Javni Mody, such as the popular Awesome Analogies or Mnifty Mnemonics, as well as learned so much about the physiology of chocoholics from a connoisseur.  She also served on conference planning committees for the 2009 Baltimore Annual conference and two regional conferences. Carol also involved her students in the pilot study for the A&P 1 only version of the HAPS Exam.

Most recently, Carol was elected to the Board of Directors as Secretary for two terms since 2013, serving with four HAPS presidents.  As a result, she played a role in the initial development and the mid-term review of the HAPS 2014 – 2019 Strategic Plan that provides the great vision and process to lead HAPS successfully into the future.  Carol was chosen for this award based on her work in these many roles as she ends her term as HAPS secretary and retires from Anne Arundel Community College (AACC) near Annapolis, MD.  She has already committed to continuing her involvement with HAPS with initial plans for a team workshop in Columbus OH and agreeing to serve as Chair-in-Training under Don Kelly as the next co-chair of the Foundation Oversight committee for Grants and Scholarships.

It was my honor to present Carol with this well-deserved recognition and we all look forward to her continued HAPS contributions as a retired emerita member.

2017 HAPS-Thieme Award for Excellence in Teaching

Each year Thieme supports great teaching by supporting one of the largest scholarships that HAPS awards.  This is always a very difficult award to give, because HAPS is full of amazing educators.  This year’s winner was also the 2017 Conference Chair and hosted the conference at the University of Utah.  We all congratulate Mark Nielsen on his amazing teaching.  You can read more about Mark below.

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Anne Kaiser of Thieme and HAPS President Terry Thompson with Mark Nielsen (center)

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Mark Nielsen is a professor of anatomical sciences at the University of Utah where he has taught a wide variety of anatomy courses for the past thirty years. His teaching expertise includes comparative vertebrate anatomy, embryology, neuroanatomy, human anatomy, histology, and the history of anatomy. He has taught anatomy to over 30,000 students, which include undergraduates, medical students, physician assistant students, and massage therapy students. In teaching this diverse population of students he has been recognized as one of the outstanding teachers at the University, where he has received every recognized teaching award from both students and colleagues, some of them multiple times. He has also received a number of national teaching awards. He teaches demanding courses that exact high expectations of his students, but he teaches them how to navigate the details of anatomy through an understanding of principles and patterns of developmental and comparative anatomy. He loves to see students eyes light up as they learn to consume large quantities of information with the elegant patterns he shares with them. He has trained approximately 1,500 teaching assistants through his anatomy teaching program, many who have gone on to become outstanding teachers. He is also the author of numerous nationally and internationally recognized anatomy textbooks and software programs.

 


Don’t forget that as part of their support for HAPS members, Thieme offers 30% off and free shipping on their products using the code HAPS30 at checkout

2017 Gail Jenkins Award for Teaching and Mentoring

With the support of Wiley, the Gail Jenkins Award recognizes an A&P instructor who inspires students and colleagues alike.  This year the winner was first-time conference attendee Richelle Monaghan.   You can read more about Richelle below.

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Maria Guarascio from Wiley, Richelle Monaghan, and HAPS President Terry Thompson

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Richelle Monaghan joined Wilfrid Laurier University as an Assistant Professor in 2012 as the Head of Science Programming for the Bachelor of Arts and Science (BASc) in Public Health, and was cross-appointed with the Department of Biology in 2014. Richelle completed her Ph.D. in Biology at the University of Waterloo in 2011 by developing cell culture models to study intracellular fungal parasites. She is currently the elected Chair of Parasitism, Immunity and Environment (PIE) for the Canadian Society of Zoologists. Prior to graduate school, Richelle was in private practice for 15 years as a regulated health care provider with a clinical focus on pain management. In this role, she gained strategies to explain anatomical and physiological concepts to her patients in ways that were relevant to them, and has continued to use these techniques for her students over the years. Richelle is an avid canoeist and enjoys traveling with her family.