Funding opportunities for the HAPS annual conference (part 2 of 2)

In addition to the Supported Awards that we covered in our previous post, there are four additional awards administered by the HAPS Awards & Scholarships Committee. These four awards fall into the category of HAPS Awards because they are funded by the HAPS organization using money donated by HAPS members. Each award targets a specific category of HAPS members to help them attend the HAPS Annual Conference in May 2020.

1 – The Robert B. Anthony Travel Award is for full-time faculty during their first five years of teaching.

2 – The Full-Time Faculty Travel Award is for full-time faculty who have taught for more than five years. 

3 – The Contingent Faculty Travel Award is for contingent faculty (see link for how HAPS defines “contingent” faculty).

 4 – The Student/Postdoc Travel Award has been expanded this year to include undergraduates as well as graduate students and postdocs.

All four awards pay the registration fee for the 2020 HAPS Annual Conference plus $400 to help with travel expenses to attend the conference

The final deadline to submit your application and one letter of recommendation is January 3, 2020.

More details about the awards and access to award applications can be found on the HAPS website:

Questions? Please contact Carol Veil, Chair of the HAPS Grants and Scholarships Committee.

 

Funding opportunities for the HAPS annual conference (part 1 of 2)

If you could use some financial assistance to travel to the 2020 HAPS Annual Conference in Ottawa, consider applying for an award administered by the HAPS Awards & Scholarships (A&S) Committee.  Seven total awards are offered this year.  This post details the Supported Awards which are funded by a vendor or an individual donor.

The ADInstruments Sam Drogo New Technology in the Classroom Award award encourages the innovative use of technology to engage undergraduates in human anatomy and physiology. The winner receives $500 to attend the HAPS Annual Conference.

The Gail Jenkins Teaching and Mentoring Award is for a HAPS member who demonstrates use of engaging learning activities to help students truly understand and retain Anatomy and Physiology with kinesthetic and active learning strategies and inexpensive everyday props. The award also recognizes those who mentor other instructors to incorporate active learning in their teaching to benefit more students. The winner will receive $1000 cash award provided by Wiley and will also have their registration waived for the HAPS Annual Conference in May 2020.

 The John Martin Second-Timer Award is a new award this year.  It is for HAPS members who have attended only one previous HAPS Annual Conference (does not matter which year, as long as it was an annual conference) and are in need of some financial assistance to attend this year’s annual conference as a Second Timer. The winner will receive $500 to use toward attending the HAPS Annual Conference.   Applicants must be full-time or contingent college/university faculty or full-time high school faculty, currently teaching anatomy & physiology with at least part of the teaching load being face-to-face, as opposed to totally online teaching.

The final deadline to submit your application and one letter of recommendation is January 3, 2020. 

More details about the awards and access to award applications can be found on the HAPS website:

Questions? Please contact Carol Veil, Chair of the HAPS Grants and Scholarships Committee.

Research Update on the Gut-Implant Microenvironment Axis

Hi HAPsters,

I am happy to be writing a follow-up on the work I presented to you at the HAPS meeting in Portland, OR in May 2019. To briefly recap, I use an in vivo rat model of osteolysis to understand the mechanisms driving implant loosening. After bilateral intramedullary implants are placed, weekly injections of particles are administered to each knee joint. These particles are either LPS-doped polyethylene (LPS-PE) or cobalt-chromium (CoCr); two materials common to orthopedic implants. I discovered that the particle challenge in this model is associated with pro-inflammatory alterations in the gut microbiome as shown at the phylum level.

Figure 1Fecal Firmicutes / Bacteroidetes ratio at the phylum level (1-way ANOVA p = 0.0282).

I also confirmed histologically that macrophage presence in the synovium is dependent upon particle challenge. Liver histology, which was read blindly by a veterinary pathologist, showed differential presence/absence of inflammation with particle treatment (p = 0.013, chi-square). Thus, we know there is inflammation local to the knee joint and remote in the liver; however, it is not currently clear if the liver effects precede, were secondary to, or were simply coincident with changes in the gut microbiome.

In a recently completed probiotic treatment experiment, I aimed to induce osteolysis using CoCr particles and then prevent implant loosening with a probiotic treatment of Lactobacillus reuteri. L. reuteri has been shown to decrease gut inflammation and increase bone density, prevent bone loss following ovariectomy and prevent bone loss post-antibiotic treatment in mice[1-4]. Plus, this probiotic has been shown to reduce age-related bone loss in a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial in humans[5]. Therefore, from the literature, this probiotic seemed to be a good candidate to dampen implant loosening from peri-implant bone loss. However, I found that the probiotic treatment did not change the gut microbiome and did not affect the implant microenvironment in Sprague-Dawley rats. From the microbiome analysis, I now know that S-D rats have an already high abundance of L.reuteri in their colon. A few possible reasons for the lack of probiotic effect in my model are: 1) there was no ‘niche’ in the gut for MORE L. reuteri to settle into, 2) the dose I administered was too low and/or 3) my probiotic was not viable. On another note, I have also learned that when I do not induce a change in the peri-implant bone (because sometimes our model does not ‘behave’), then the gut microbiome is unaffected. Together, our data still support the interaction between alterations in the gut microbiome and peri-implant bone loss following particle challenge.

Figure 2

Bidirectional gut-implant microenvironment cycle.

Don’t give up on the probiotics! The above-cited literature tells us this bacteria increases bone! Just because I did not get it to work in my model on the first try does not mean all hope is lost. I plan to revisit L. reuteri treatment in an upcoming experiment (after I complete a dose-response study) that will also include a prebiotic (high fiber ‘food’ for the bacteria already in the gut) treatment. Currently, I’m pursuing local inflammatory gene expression in the synovium and peri-implant tissue to determine if there is local upregulation and I plan to expand this to remote gene expression in the colon.

References

  1. Britton RA, Irwin R, Quach D, Schaefer L, Zhang J, Lee T, Parameswaran N, McCabe LR. Probiotic L. reuteri treatment prevents bone loss in a menopausal ovariectomized mouse model. J Cell Physiol 229(11): 1822, 2014
  2. McCabe LR, Irwin R, Schaefer L, Britton RA. Probiotic use decreases intestinal inflammation and increases bone density in healthy male but not female mice. J Cell Physiol 228(8): 1793, 2013
  3. Schepper JD, Collins FL, Rios-Arce ND, Raehtz S, Schaefer L, Gardinier JD, Britton RA, Parameswaran N, McCabe LR. Probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri Prevents Postantibiotic Bone Loss by Reducing Intestinal Dysbiosis and Preventing Barrier Disruption. J Bone Miner Res 34(4): 681, 2019
  4. Collins FL, Rios-Arce ND, Schepper JD, Jones AD, Schaefer L, Britton RA, McCabe LR, Parameswaran N. Beneficial effects of Lactobacillus reuteri 6475 on bone density in male mice is dependent on lymphocytes. Sci Rep 9(1): 14708, 2019
  5. Nilsson AG, Sundh D, Backhed F, Lorentzon M. Lactobacillus reuteri reduces bone loss in older women with low bone mineral density: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, clinical trial. J Intern Med 284(3): 307, 2018

Headshot Feb 2017

Dr. Moran is an Assistant Professor at Rush University Medical Center (RUMC) in the Department of Cell & Molecular Medicine in Chicago, IL. She conducts basic and translational research to understand the connection between the gut and bone. She uses a pre-clinical model of aseptic peri-implant osteolysis, which is bone loss around an implant, which is triggered by inflammation. This model mimics the osteolytic condition in humans with failed implants. Her goal is to understand the connection between the gut and bone to ultimately identify novel, non-invasive means to delay or mitigate implant loosening and the resulting invasive implant revision surgery by targeting the gut. Dr. Moran also taught human gross anatomy for 10 years to first-year medical students and physical therapy students.

Vibrating beyond anatomy

The first breath.

The downbeat.

Music surrounds me.

I am happy.

 

I smile at my memory of singing in a choir.

I grew up oscillating between playing the piano and taking apart human anatomical models, so I was thrilled when 2019 HAPS speaker Lawrence Sherman, from Oregon Health & Science University, brought together my two favorite worlds: science and music.

The MRI scans of active music-making were fascinating. Dr. Sherman showed how the same parts of the brain are activated when one is learning new music, regardless of ability. Another scan showed an improvising jazz pianist which displayed that several parts of the brain turn off during this intense activity. He went on to explain exciting research on how music can stimulate neurogenesis

As Dr. Sherman led us through this data, my thoughts drifted to my own experiences as a musical performer. As a young adult, I had the privilege of singing with The Canticum Novum Singers; a New York City based chorus under the direction of Harold Rosenbaum. In one particular performance when we sang  Arnold Schoenberg’s Friede auf Erden, I experienced my anatomy in a surreal way:

We were on the stage at Lincoln Center looking out to a full house. My black binder filled with music was held high and my eyes were focused on the Maestro. The first breath. The down beat. Music surrounded me; beautiful voices, harmonies, the breath of my fellow singers… then something changed.

As I continued to sing, I felt myself as a beating heart in a body like no other. I was connected by vibrational blood vessels to the singers around me and to my conductor, who was our new nervous system, his motions telling us how fast/slow/loud/soft to sing. A powerful and unique energy field united us in song. The music on the page, a series of dots and lines, were as a genetic code, expressed by each musician and understood as we transcribed and translated our individual parts into a phenotype of beauty surrounding us and extending out to the audience.

In those moments I was a living being greater than myself. A being connected through the power of musical vibration.

Thunderous applause brought me back to myself, but the experience has always remained with me. If a scientist had analyzed my brain during that experience, what would my MRI scan have looked like in those moments? 

When we create music with a group, perhaps vibrational waves sum together and create a force grander than our own.  For many cultures, group singing is a common practice. The vibrations, tones and rhythms strengthen community and embody the musical history and evolution of humans in a way that an MRI scan can only begin to image. 

HAPS gives us another way to connect. Like singing in a choir, working and helping each other solve problems through HAPS brings us together and reminds us that no matter where we are, we have a community of professors ready to help us and connect us so that we can grow in our field.

Dr. Sherman’s talk inspired me to learn new piano music when I returned home. But more importantly, he reminded us all how music can increase neuroplasticity and ignite feelings of camaraderie. He gave us something truly special when he had the audience of his lecture stand up and sing those lovely notes from The Beatles’ Hey Jude. He bonded us not only through being at the HAPS annual meeting, but through the power of music. We vibrated together beyond our anatomy. 

We can strengthen that bond through continuing to reach out to each other in the myriad ways HAPS has to support us. I hope we can all sing together again at HAPS in Ottawa, 2020. Until then, we can hum the Beatles tune we all sang together, “nah—nah—nah, nah nah nah…”


Dr.G

Bridgit Goldman has been teaching college-level biology since 1998.  She has a Ph.D. in Cellular, Molecular, and Developmental Biology from The Graduate School and University Center of The City University of New York. Since 2007 she has designed, developed and taught all the lecture and laboratory classes in Human Anatomy and Physiology at Siena College in Loudonville, NY.

Chronic disease begins in the womb – and earlier

Dr. Kent Thornburg of Oregon Health & Science University presented an intriguing “Update Seminar” at the HAPS meeting in Portland, OR that discussed the increased incidence of some chronic diseases in the US and their likely epigenetic origins from even before we are born.

The implications of his talk were quickly apparent when he made the point that, after over a century of steady increases in life expectancy, the predicted life expectancy in the US has actually decreased since 2015. This should get everyone’s attention. Why in this age of plenty are we dying younger? Dr. Thornburg postulated that plentiful access to calorie-rich and nutrition-poor food has led to the current epidemic of obesity and its associated chronic diseases, most notably diabetes and cardiovascular complications. Indeed, to put a dollar amount on it, we are currently paying over $500 billion per year to treat cardiovascular diseases and that number is projected to reach over one trillion dollars per year by 2035. These costs are not sustainable under any sort of healthcare plan.

While clearly obesity of the current generation is a major concern, it is the prenatal epigenetic signature of obesity that is cause for even more concern. An epigenetic signature is a set of inheritable marks on our DNA due to DNA methylation and histone modifications. As a result, the nutrition state in the womb can affect the later health of the child, for example:

  1. The correlation of birth weight and risk of heart disease, diabetes, etc.  is a U-shaped curve in which being too small (< 5 lbs at birth) and being too large (> 10 lbs. at birth) are both associated with higher chances of chronic diseases in later life. Obese mothers are prone to give birth to babies who fall on either arm of the U-curve. This suggests that our health destiny is partly established by our mother and the conditions we experienced within the womb.
  2. The Dutch hunger study has shown chronic diseases were maintained in 3 successive generations of the people who faced starvation during World War II. This can be explained by the fact that the grandmother who actually suffered starvation nourished not only her baby daughter in utero, but also nourished that baby’s developing ovaries. Hence, grandma’s nourishment state could directly affect the nourishment of her children and even her grandchildren before they are born.
  3. Finally, the impact of epigenetics on our traits is no more apparent than in identical twins. An interesting bit of trivia for mystery sleuths is that the swirls that define our fingerprints are determined by nutritional state of the fetus and even with two fetuses within the same placenta, about 70% of identical twins have different fingerprints. Not surprisingly then, about 80% also die of different diseases, supporting the potential for epigenetic factors to combine with or modify genetic determinants of our health.

In summary, Dr. Thornburg concluded that we in the US are dealing with what he called “high caloric malnutrition” leading to “smoldering inflammation” in babies and future generations. Not the inflammation we commonly think of with immune system responses, but rather an inflammation caused by the “epigenetic burden” that leads to chronic disease. However, he did end with two important notes. First, we cannot blame the mothers since they are eating the same diet we all are. And secondly, based on animal studies, there is evidence that at least some of the epigenetic burden can be changed over time. So, there is hope.

Want to hear more of the story directly from Dr. Thornburg? Check out his TED Talk here. 


Copyright property of Todd Adamson

Andrew Russo is a Professor of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, and Neurology, at the University of Iowa. Dr. Russo received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, followed by postdoctoral training in molecular neurobiology at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Russo’s research area is the molecular basis of migraine. His lab uses mouse genetic models to study how the neuropeptide CGRP contributes to the pain and altered sensory perception that is a hallmark of migraine. In addition to his research, Dr. Russo enjoys teaching, which led to him becoming a co-author of Seeley’s Human Anatomy and Physiology textbook. He is a member of HAPS and especially enjoys the generally excellent update seminars at the annual meetings.

 

The 2019 Annual Conference App is here!

The 2019 HAPS Annual conference app is ready for download and ready for you!

DOWNLOAD FOR iOS                      DOWNLOAD FOR ANDROID

Full schedule, easy to access. All official events are listed in the app, and all you have to do is click on the star next to an event to add it to your personal schedule.

All workshop presenters are listed, so you can find workshops by presenter or by knowing when to look. Poster first presenters are listed as well, with poster abstracts in the presenter’s bio.

Want to participate in the social stream in the app? All you have to do is register within the app and start posting! Look in the exhibits hall in the first two days to see all social posts projected on the giant social wall!

Looking for members of the HAPS leadership? They would love to hear your suggestions and will be wearing bullseye buttons to make them easy to spot. But if you’d like to get a look at them before (or after) meeting them, all their names and photos are in the app.

HAPS conference participants come from all over the world to attend this conference, and we’ve got an interactive map of all participants in the app. As you zoom in you’ll see more and more detail down to the city level.

Interested in beginning your path towards HAPS leadership? The best start is by joining a committee. Use the app to let committee chairs know about your interest and they will contact you in June.

Need more information? The app has GPS-enabled maps to show you where you are and highlights the venues we’ll be using during the conference. There is also the “Lots more info” section with, you guessed it, lots more info.

Download the app today and get started planning your personal HAPS Annual Conference schedule!

DOWNLOAD FOR iOS                      DOWNLOAD FOR ANDROID

First HAPS Silent Auction!

You’re invited to participate in the first ever HAPS Silent Auction in Portland, Oregon!

For those of you who are attending the 2019 HAPS Annual Conference in Portland, Oregon this May, we hope that you consider bringing a little something to donate to the HAPS Silent Auction. The HAPS Fundraising Committee is trying something new out this year and we hope you’ll join in on the fun!  The items can be something from your hometown or home institution.  Anything small and interesting (sorry, but HAPS does not have the ability to receive or send shipped items, so the item must be small enough to travel with you to the meeting and home to the winner from the meeting). Examples include a copy of a book authored, handcrafted jewelry or other accessories, school sports items (like mugs, t-shirts, etc.), and gift certificates.

The Silent Auction will take place in the exhibit hall during the first day of the Update Seminars (Thursday, May 23 from 7:30 am to 6:15 pm). Attendees will have until 6:15 pm on Thursday to bid on their favorite items! At the end of the bidding period, the individual with the highest bid will receive the item (in exchange for the monetary bid).

Please bring your donated items to the registration desk at the Oregon Convention Center on Wednesday, May 22 from 1:00 – 5:00 pm. Convention Center on Wednesday, May 22 from 1:00 – 5:00 pm.

All attendees can participate in the auction, irrespective of whether they donated an item or not. However, the more items donated, the more interesting and fun the auction will be!

If altruism wasn’t enough, here’s the bonus!  If you donate an item or bid on an item in an amount that is more than the retail value, you will receive a tax donation receipt!

If you have any questions, please contact the HAPS Main Office at 1-800-448-4277 or info@hapsconnect.org.

Articulating a Joint Meeting

2019 HAPS-AACA Southern Regional Meeting Artwork

Two great professional societies — One great regional conference!

Much like the Kentucky Derby packs a lot of excitement in two short minutes of horse racing, we are going to be packing a ton of Anatomy and Physiology into one fabulous conference day and you can bet you won’t want to miss it!  The American Association for Clinical Anatomists (AACA) and the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society (HAPS) invite YOU to attend our first ever Joint AACA/HAPS Regional Conference at Bellarmine University in Louisville, KY (home of the Kentucky Derby!) on Saturday, March 30, 2019.  Great speakers, workshops, posters, and even multiple cadaver lab experiences await you. The last day to register at the Early Bird registration rate and submit a workshop or poster proposal is March 1, 2019.

How did this joint venture get started?  In the fall of 2015, I moved from Houston, TX to Louisville, KY and I met Dr. David Porta in the Biology Department at Bellarmine University.  He was teaching Gross Anatomy and I was teaching Vertebrate Physiology and we both were teaching Human Anatomy & Physiology. As David showed me where lab supplies were and we small talked, we discovered we both served on the boards of professional societies, AACA for him and HAPS for me.  Because we obviously weren’t busy enough and we thought there would be some synergy between the interests of AACA and HAPS, we hatched an idea to co-host a regional meeting. We had round table discussions with a few more anatomists from Bellarmine and the University of Louisville and we outlined what we think will be a great conference for instructors of Anatomy and Physiology.  Here’s a glimpse of the platform presentations and cadaver workshop opportunities.

Dr. Jeffrey Petruska will be presenting research on neural connectivity recently discovered by using modern molecular techniques combined with old school classical neurophysiology and gross anatomy observations.  My co-host Dr. David Porta will be presenting his research on the biomechanical techniques used to analyze different types of bone fractures and how this data has been used as legal evidence in hit-and-run as well as malpractice cases.  David will offer coordinating workshops in the cadaver lab where participants will extract bone, mount it on the fracturing apparatus, and then analyze the fragments.

Hope to see you in Louisville!

Rachel Hopp

RHopp2017

Conference Co-Host Rachel Hopp, PhD, Department of Biology, University of Louisville, Southern Regional Director of HAPS

David Porta Head shot

Conference Co-Host and Update Speaker David Porta, PhD, Department of Biology, Bellarmine University, Past Program Secretary of AACA

Petruska_cr

Update Speaker Jeffrey Petruska, PhD, Department of Anatomical Sciences & Neurobiology, Member of the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine

 

Call for applications from the HAPS Grants and Scholarships Committee

Are you looking for funding to help you attend the 2019 HAPS Annual Conference in Portland?  Then you will be happy to hear the latest news from the HAPS Grants & Scholarships Committee!

There are now 4 HAPS Awards that target four different groups of HAPS members.  Three of these groups have been targeted in previous years:

  • Graduate students and postdocs
  • Contingent faculty
  • Full-time faculty who have taught five or fewer years

But this year we are introducing an additional award for a new group of HAPS members:

  • Full-time faculty who have taught for more than five years

All four of these HAPS Awards are now travel awards, which means that they both cover the cost of conference registration, and provide an additional $400 for partial reimbursement of travel expenses getting to the conference!

In addition to the HAPS awards, there are also three Sponsored Awards:

  • ADinstruments Sam Drogo Technology in the Classroom Award – sponsored by ADinstruments
  • HAPS-Thieme Excellence in Teaching Award – sponsored by Thieme Publishers
  • Gail Jenkins Teaching and Mentoring Award – sponsored by Wiley

Click to get information and applications for all of the HAPS Awards and the Sponsored Awards.

January 4, 2019 is the deadline to apply for all awards and to submit any required letters of recommendation.  Start the application process today!

Questions? Please contact Carol Veil, Chair of the HAPS Grants and Scholarships Committee.

buy-cash-coins-9660

Concept Mapping in A&P – One Instructor’s Experience

I assigned concept maps as homework in my A&P courses and it has proven to be extremely effective. Students are provided instructions for how to access a free concept mapping website and a list of concepts to be included in their map. I typically assign one map per major topic or body system (8-10 per semester). Concepts to be included are heavily based on the HAPS Learning Outcomes. Since students can make concept maps in many different ways, they are primarily graded for level of detail and completeness. After the first assignment is submitted, I choose several maps and display them anonymously to the class. I ask students to identify how that particular map is helpful and to find ways the map might be improved, stressing their use as study tools. As students gain experience, the quality of their maps improves significantly. By the end of the semester, many are astonishingly complex and detailed.

Screen Shot 2018-11-28 at 21.20.46
(Click on image above or here for a full-size PDF)

Student scores on a standardized departmental final have improved in the classes that I’ve utilized concept mapping and many students reported that concept maps were extremely helpful in A&P.  Many nursing programs now heavily integrate concept mapping into nursing education so this assignment was particularly helpful to pre-nursing students. I also discovered that the rate of homework completion was higher for concept maps than more “traditional” homework. Students stated that creating the map forced them to really read the text and think about how the concepts related to each other, but that they were also fun!

Since several of these students had previously utilized concept mapping in my courses, they volunteered to create a comprehensive concept map that included all of the 900+ HAPS Learning Outcomes. Their goal was to use this project to reinforce their own understanding of A&P and to create a teaching tool that could be displayed for future student use.

They worked on this project on their own time between early January and mid-May, 2018, including spring break, while also juggling classes, jobs, and other responsibilities. The final product, a 16-foot-long concept map with over 5000 elements, was printed and displayed during the conference.

IMG_0313
Paul Luyster, Associate Professor of Biology, and nine TCC students, Brian Cisneros, Daniel Duran, Stephanie Galaviz-Webster, Jocelyn Gonzalez, Karely Leon, Mitchell McDowell, Auston McIntosh, Lisabel Ruiz-Steblein, and Jami Williams, presented a workshop titled “Using Case Studies and Concept Mapping Assignments to Enhance Student Engagement and Learning in A&P” at the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society (HAPS) Conference in Columbus, Ohio, May, 2018.

These students are proud of their concept map but even more importantly, they know with certainty that they have constructed – in a diagram and in their mind – a detailed set of concepts and relationships that integrates all of the important aspects of A&P.. They know their stuff, and they KNOW that they know it. Isn’t that what teaching is all about?


pluyster

Paul Luyster is an Associate Professor of Biology at Tarrant County College, Fort Worth, Texas, where he enjoys teaching Anatomy and Physiology, Majors Biology, Undergraduate Biology Research, and an Environmental Biology Wilderness Course.