Meet a HAPSter- Quelly from Brazil!

This post describes Quelly Shaive’s anatomy program in Manaus, Brazil.


Anatomy for Medicine is a class which emphasizes the application of anatomy knowledge within a clinical anatomy model.  The approach of Anatomy for Medicine is topographic, where we explore each segment, structure or organ in great detail . This course is divided into 2 parts: Anatomy I and II. This course consists of teaching the anatomy itself as well as pertinent clinical correlations to facilitate student learning and to prepare them for further clinical and surgical education. Students are responsible for presenting seminars where they demonstrate their understanding of anatomy within a clinical case format.

The aims of Human Anatomy I (given in the first period) and Human Anatomy II (given in the second period) are to know the main aspects of regional anatomy and the relationships with the clinical diagnosis of major diseases that affect humans.  Students also have guidance on anatomical dissection practices and the technical notion of invasive procedures, both diagnostic and therapeutic.

Our topographical approach focuses on the regional division of the human body and incorporates in its discussions the medical/surgical importance and applied anatomical knowledge.  This provides students of medicine good learning conditions to study the subjects that are prerequisite: Medical Propedeutics, Neuropsicoimunologia and Operative Technique and Experimental Surgery.

We have 8 teachers and we count on the help of Teacher’s Assistants, who are selected through written test. These Teacher’s Assistants give us support in practical classes, help students in extra class schedules, organize symposiums and events in anatomy and perform the anatomoclinical sessions. The Teacher’s Assistants also participate in events outside the state of Amazonas, such as Brazilian Medical Education Congress.

The Federal University of Amazonas (UFAM) offers the discipline of Anatomy for various courses in the health area, which is offered according to the needs of each course as shown in the table below:

COURSE DISCIPLINE WORKING HOURS
Degree in Sciences: Chemistry and Biology Anatomy and Physiology 60 H
Dentistry Fundamentals of Human Anatomy 90 H
Natural Sciences, Physical Education, Biological Sciences and Psychology Fundamentals of Human Anatomy 60 H
Pharmacy Human anatomy 90 H
Physiotherapy Fundamentals of Human Anatomy

Functional Anatomy Neuroanatomy

90 H

120 H

60 H

It is noteworthy that these subjects offered by UFAM are not exactly the same for all federal universities in Brazil; however, there is equivalence of the nomenclature, workload and content approach.  The Ministry of Education and Culture (MEC) is the institution which determines accreditation and coordination for all public and private universities.

Some studies published in Brazil show that anatomical teaching in our country began on 18 February 1808 by Decision No Régia. 2, D. João VI, the Bahia School of Surgery, was formed in Salvador, and over the years, other medical schools were opened in Brazil until today.

The Anatomy courses are divided into theoretical and practical classes. For lectures, we make use of Power Point and whiteboard. The classes are held in laboratories with real human specimens without using any advanced technology, such as 3D Dissection Tables. The human cadaver parts used for dissection are preserved in formaldehyde, alcohol and glycerine. When anatomical variations are found they are cataloged and published in appropriate journals.

The importance of the use of cadaver dissection is appreciated for providing a faithful model of the future student reality. UFAM has adopted these practices to help students of anatomy, favoring the development of teamwork, respect for the body, familiarization with the body, application of practical skills, integration of theory and practice and preparation for clinical work

To improve my performance in class, I participated for the first time in the 30th HAPS Annual Conference in May 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia. As a member of HAPS, I receive messages daily about novelties in anatomy, clinical discussions of best books tips, applications, websites and videos that is of great value to improve my knowledge in the area. I have a long way to go in higher education, and I know I can count on the support of HAPS and my fellow members to improve my teaching of one of the oldest arts in the world: Anatomy.

quelly
Quelly Shiave, in her Anatomy Laboratory – UFAM.  Painting the background made by a former student of Medicine.

Quelly Shiave is a professor of anatomy at the Federal University of Amazonas (UFAM) in Manaus, Brazil.

2017-2018 Call for Nominations: An Opportunity to Serve

This post comes to you from Judi Nath, HAPS President Elect.

Reading the HAPS listserv and HAPS Educator, serving on the board or  a committee, reviewing position statements, implementing HAPS learning outcomes and returning from an annual or regional conference with new ideas are all ways that I have benefitted from the volunteer efforts of our many engaged HAPS members. Hearing from others who express their gratitude for the services offered by our organization provides evidence that we are helping meet the professional needs of the A&P instructors we represent. Yet, there are always improvements to be made, fresh ideas to be considered, and management tasks that must be completed. A vibrant and dedicated leadership team helps guide the HAPS organization in these various areas. Please consider joining this team, or nominating others, for the Board positions that will be open for elections in Spring 2018.

As HAPS President-Elect, it is my privilege to chair the annual Nominating Committee and solicit potential candidates for leadership positions. Working with me this year on the Nominating Committee are Javni Mody, Kevin Petti , and Dic Charge. You will likely recognize these people because each individual has served HAPS in various roles too numerous to mention throughout many years of devoted membership.

We are currently accepting nominations for candidates to fill four HAPS offices with terms that will commence on July 1, 2018.  These offices are the following: President-Elect, Treasurer, Eastern Regional Director, and Western Regional Director.  Both self-nominations and nominations from colleagues are welcome and are due to the Nominating Committee by January 31, 2018.  Questions can be submitted to me.

All discussions of potential candidates will remain confidential within the Nominating Committee.  The Nominating Committee will review all nominations and verify willingness to serve.  A final slate of candidates will be recommended to the Board of Directors for approval in March, with a maximum of two candidates for President-Elect and maximum of three candidates for each of the other offices.  The final candidates will be asked to provide a biography, position statement, and photo for the April ballot.

All elected officers serve on the Board of Directors during their designated term.  The Board holds in-person meetings twice a year:  one occurs during a weekend in October (next year’s meeting will be held in Denver), and the other occurs for two days prior to the annual conference in the host city).  The work of the Board is conducted the rest of the year through scheduled monthly e-meetings, synchronous video calls, and other asynchronous communication as needed.

Descriptions of the roles and responsibilities of each office can be found in the HAPS Bylaws available on the HAPS website (login required).  Below is a short synopsis of each office that will be filled in the 2018 election:

President-Elect

Election to this office involves a three-year commitment, one year each as President-Elect, President, and Past-President.  The year as President-Elect provides a year to become accustomed to serving on the Board of Directors before transitioning into the role of President.  The President, in consultation with the Board, provides direction and guidance by establishing and managing the policies and affairs of the Society.  Following the President’s term, they become Past-President to provide leadership continuity.

Treasurer

The Treasurer is the chief fiscal officer of the Society, one of the official signing officers, and serves on the Executive Committee.  The Treasurer oversees all financial transactions, keeps financial records and prepares the annual budget in consultation with the Board of Directors and Steering Committee.  The Treasurer’s term of office is for two (2) years, but there is no limit to consecutive terms.

Regional Directors (Eastern & Western Regions – see website for boundaries.)

Although each Regional Director serves as a representative of one of the four HAPS regions to ensure diverse geographical representation on the Board of Directors, they are elected by the entire membership.  Each acts as a liaison between the region’s constituency and the Board and promotes increased involvement of the region’s membership in the activities of the Society, including regional conferences.  Each Regional Director’s term of office is for two (2) years.  Regional Directors may not serve more than two (2) consecutive terms.

Becoming part of the HAPS leadership team is a great way to give back to our organization and to enhance personal and professional development within a nationally respected educational society.  Whether you, or someone you know, would be interested in this opportunity, please let us know.

For those who are not comfortable participating at the Board level at this time, but who are still interested in becoming involved, please consider participating on a HAPS committee.  We value the time and talent of all those who strive to improve HAPS.

HAPS Offers Grants and Scholarships!

In 1994 the HAPS Executive Committee initiated a program of modest grants, scholarships, and awards for anatomy and/or physiology faculty and their students. These awards support the mission statement of the Society, which is to promote excellence in the teaching of human anatomy and physiology. Applications for all grants, scholarships, and awards must be submitted online. Links to online applications, eligibility, and additional information can be found on each grant-specific webpage.

The submission deadline for all the scholarships listed below is December 1, 2017. Some of the applications require letters of recommendation, so now is a great time to check them out.

Click on a grant or scholarship to see if you qualify!

The deadline to submit your application for any of the above scholarships is December 1st. So go on and get started!

Join HAPS– for the conversations!

The HAPS Discussion group (also known as HAPS-L and before that as “the listserv”) is the place where the most interesting conversations in A&P are happening.  This discussion group has hundreds of members, is very active, and has often features amazingly high level conversations among leaders in the field.  This group was started in 1998 as an email listserv, and some still call it that, but it is a modern discussion group with email preferences and a web archive.  The HAPS discussion group is open to all current HAPS members and is one of the most valuable perks of membership.

This week, one discussion revolved around the most accurate classification of bone types. In this discussion, Mark Nielsen (University of Utah Anatomy Professor and winner of the 2017 HAPS-Theime Excellence in Teaching Award) shared multiple illuminating contributions to the conversation. Check out the excerpt below…and then imagine having content like THIS delivered to your email box on a regular basis.

WOW, there is a lot of interesting discussion going on here, this is one of the nice things about the HAPS listserve. It is always great to share and discuss. While I agree with many of the sage comments about classification and “does it really matter because the bones do not care or know where they fit in the scheme of things”, it is still important to recognize that there is correct and incorrect within a classification scheme. Following is the bases of the classification scheme:

Long bone = what is the one characteristic shared by long bones that none of the other bone types have, one thing and one thing only, a medullary cavity, and yes all the phalanges, even the small distal phalanges have a medullary cavity, as does the clavicle. The following bones have a medullary cavity:

  • clavicle
  • humerus
  • radius
  • ulna
  • metacarpals
  • proximal phalanges of hand
  • middle phalanges of hand
  • distal phalanges of hand
  • femur
  • tibia
  • fibula
  • metatarsals
  • proximal phalanges of foot
  • middle phalanges of foot
  • distal phalanges of foot

I believe someone stated that long bones are characterized because they have a diaphysis with proximal and distal epiphyses. This is not true. Many long bones only have epiphyses at one end and not the other. This is the case for many of the phalanges. Again, the characteristic that defines a long bone is the presence of a medullary cavity. Besides, many bones have epiphyses – for example, short bones and irregular bones have epiphyses.

Short bones = are characterized by a core of spongy bone with an outer covering of compact bone. They typically have a length, width, and depth that are approximately of equal dimensions. The carpal and tarsal bones are placed in this category.

Flat bones = the true flat bones of the body all reside in the skull, but the ribs are also often considered to fall in this category because their bone structure is similar to the flat bones of the skull. These are bones that are characterized by external and internal tables (laminae) of compact bone sandwiching dense trabecular diploe, the diploic spaces of the trabecular bone being filled with hemopoetic red marrow in the living subject. This would include the parietal bones, frontal bone, squamous portion of the occipital bone and temporal bone, sutural or wormian bones that are ossification centers that never fused with the fore mentioned bones.

Most of the remaining bones did not fit into one of these three categories. Like the short bones and flat bones all the remaining bones had an outer covering of compact bone and an internal core of spongy bone and no medullary cavity, but they were not short and they were not flat. This led to the next category that became the catch all:

Irregular bones = a variety of bone shapes consisting of an outer covering of compact bone and a central core of spongy bone, with some bone surfaces that are so flat and thin that they lack spongey bone completely e.g., the scapula, ethmoid. Most of the other bones fall in this category – vertebrae, the bones of the facial skeleton and inferior cranial vault bones, hyoid, malleus, incus, stapes, and the scapula and os coxae.

The final category is the sesamoid bones = these are bones that form within tendons. In human anatomy they are similar in bony structure to short bones but have a unique classification as sesamoid bones because of their location within tendons. In some other vertebrates they are very long slender bones within tendons.

One other recognized category is a pneumatized bone. These are bones that contain air spaces within their cores and can overlap with other categories. For example, the frontal bone is both a flat bone and a pneumatized bone. The ethmoid bone, sphenoid bone, and petromastoid part of the temporal bone are both irregular bones and pneumatized bones.

So there is a logic to classification and it is not a random thing that we can bend to our whims. We now have the choice to ignore it or teach it correctly.

So if you’re a HAPS member, by all means, join this discussion group. And if you’re not a member, JOIN HAPS so you can join the discussion group. (Then adjust your email settings, because most HAPSters have experienced the infamous “blown up email box” that results from some of the more rigorous conversations! Thankfully, executive director Peter English wrote a blog post with instructions for doing just that.)

Please Vote in the Elections for Board Positions!

President-Elect Ron Gerrits

Serving as an officer in any organization requires a commitment of time and effort. Because HAPS members generally lead busy lives, it can be a challenge finding candidates who are confident they can devote enough time to managing the current affairs of HAPS while also strategically planning for its future. In spite of these challenges, there was a strong response to the nomination process this year and the Nominating Committee is excited to finalize a slate of candidates that nearly fills the allotted slots allowed for balloting. In fact, we had more nominations this year than ever for multiple positions, such that we were not able to put all of those interested on the ballot. This increase in interest in leadership positions speaks well of the engagement level of the society and we are hopeful that it will continue into the future.

Besides identifying qualified candidates, an organization also benefits when there is a high level of participation by the general membership in the election process. I am requesting that all of us review the descriptions of the open positions, read the candidate statements and complete the ballots when received.

The positions that are up for election starting in July 2017 include the following:

President-Elect:
Election to this office involves a three-year commitment, one year each as President-Elect, President, and Past-President.  The year as President-Elect provides a year to become accustomed to serving on the Board of Directors before transitioning into the role of President.  The President, in consultation with the Board, provides direction and guidance by establishing and managing the policies and affairs of the Society.  Following the President’s term, they become Past-President to provide leadership continuity.  

Secretary:
The Secretary is responsible for maintaining the official records of the Society. This includes recording minutes of Board and general membership meetings, and maintaining bylaws and other corporate documents. The Secretary’s term of office is for two (2) years.

Regional Directors (Central & Southern Regions)
Although each Regional Director serves as a representative of one of the four HAPS regions to ensure diverse geographical representation on the Board of Directors, they are elected by the entire membership.  They act as a liaison between the region’s constituency and the Board and promote increased involvement of the region’s membership in the activities of the Society, including regional conferences.  Each Regional Director’s term of office is for two (2) years. The current incumbents each qualify to serve again.

The candidate information and biographies can be found here, which summarize the activities of these members both within and outside of HAPS.


HAPS members will receive ballots on March 13



HAPS members will receive ballots today, so please watch out for them in your email.  The voting will continue through March 31. Because we have three candidates for each Regional Director, as well as for Secretary, we are utilizing instant runoff voting this year (a form of preferential voting in Robert’s Rules of Order). Instant runoff voting is a form of rank order voting that is commonly used in universities and municipalities when there are more than two candidates for a position. It provides a mechanism for obtaining a majority vote without having to hold additional rounds of balloting, which might otherwise be required. You will be asked to rank candidates in order of preference (1-3). We understand that this can be challenging, especially if you consider all candidates strong, but it is necessary in order to hold the elections in an efficient manner.

Election results will be announced in April, as well as at the annual conference in Salt Lake City.

Thanks to everyone in advance for taking the time to participate in the election process. And a special thanks to those that have agreed to serve in office if elected. It is a commitment that benefits all in the society.


Ron Gerrits is the HAPS President-Elect & 2016-2017 Nominating Committee Chair.  He is a Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the Milwaukee School of Engineering.  Vote now

Journal of a New HAPster: Shani Golovay

HAPS is a society focused on the teaching and learning anatomy and physiology.  We’re always looking for new members to join the community.  Check out some thoughts from new HAPSter, Shani Golovay.  

Meet Shani Golovay, a new HAPSter.
Meet Shani Golovay, a new HAPSter.

“But I have a degree in Plant Biology.  I don’t really know anything about Human Physiology, except what I teach in General Biology.”  And this started my journey to HAPS.

I found the HAPS website to be helpful as soon as I joined. I hunted down the Course Guidelines  and Learning Outcomes right away because I needed a syllabus and some ideas on how much content to cover in the course.  Then I found the Guided Inquiry Activities by Murray Jensen. I tried out the activities with my students right away- and they loved them.  I was starting to feel like I could teach this class after all, and I felt like I had a giant community of people helping me that I didn’t even know.

I learn more from the HAPS email listserv then I do from most professional journals I receive.  I was amazed how open and helpful everyone was with each other.  I look forward to the listserv conversations and I learn so much. It was so refreshing to find a whole group of people willing to share their expertise with those of us way out of our area. If I emailed someone a question, they would explain things and even send me documents or ideas.  I am much more confident about teaching this Human Physiology class because of HAPS.  I think Human Physiology may be my new favorite class to teach because of all the awesome ideas I get from other HAPSters.  I was telling my colleagues about this society where everyone was nice and actually helpful and wanted to share ideas about teaching and everyone was impressed and a bit jealous that I had found such a group.

I am just so grateful to find a community of people where those with experience and lots of talent are willing to help those of us just starting out with these classes.  We need each other because we can’t talk about this sort of stuff over dinner except with each other, right?

The best part for me was the annual meeting, but that is another blog post…..

What’s on Your Bucket List?

HAPS is a society focused on the teaching and learning anatomy and physiology, but educators are just half of this equation.  We wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for our students.  Check out the fifth post in a series of HAPS blog posts featuring A&P student extraordinaire, Becca Ludwig.  

A message from Becca!
A post from Becca!

One semester I had an assignment that was unusual. I was tasked with creating a bucket list and then crossing one thing off of the list by the end of the semester and write a reflection paper about it. This was an odd assignment as it had nothing to do with the occupational therapy world, but as I was creating the list for the assignment I found that a bucket list had everything to do with the OT world and life in general.

A bucket list provides a way for goals to be set and the motivation to obtain them. Many students get bogged down with the stressors of the semesters and completing the requirements to get their degree. I see it in my peer’s faces. The worry about what will happen tomorrow, how I will get a job, who they will marry, how they will pay off their loans. The list is endless. Those are valid concerns, but what they are forgetting is that they have their whole life ahead of them to sort out those details. Many students lack sometimes the ability to see that there is more to life than school. If I were to ask 100 people on my small campus what is one thing that they want to accomplish the top three answers would probably be:

  1. Get married (there are more females than males on campus. The pickings are pretty slim! It's all good!)
  2. Get a degree
  3. Find a job
Make your bucket list, then cross something off it!
Make your bucket list, then cross something off it!

Those are all practical things to want and desire, but my question is what is the one thing that they will look back on and say they accomplished it? Life is not textbook in manor. No one can tell you how to live your life, you can decide. Why not take the challenge to do something for yourself and accomplish something that you never thought you could? The bucket list challenge was one of my hardest assignments because I was challenged to do something for me. I challenge you HAPSters to do the same thing to your students and watch how the students react. This assignment might change everything.