We’re Baaaaack!

A message from the HAPS Communication Committee Chair, Wendy Riggs.
A message from the HAPS Communication Committee Chair, Wendy Riggs.

Greetings everyone!  Just as you are all gearing up for the fall term, so is the HAPS Communication Committee gearing up to bring you news and updates from the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society.

We’re excited to bring HAPS out of summer break and back online with Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and even Instagram. Hunt us down on those social media venues and start following our weekly updates, which will keep you in the know.

This fall, we’re going to play with some new blog-er-ific ideas.  Instead of coordinating a single blog theme for the term, we are recruiting awesome HAPSters to compose various pieces on topics of their choosing.  We will publish these new pieces on MONDAYS (except for when we publish them on FRIDAYS, like today, because the blog-master (that would be ME) is trying to stretch out her summer just a bit more!), so you can look forward to a Monday morning treat from the HAPS Blog.

We’d also love to encourage conversation around the blog posts. Please let us know what you think of the topics we’re choosing and if you’re feeling really ambitious, we’d love to have you contribute a post or two.

Finally, we are excited to begin a “Best of the Blog” column in the peer-reviewed HAPS-EDucator.

Check out the 2015 Conference Edition of the HAPS-EDucator.
Check out the 2015 Annual Conference Edition of the HAPS-EDucator.

This column will run in every issue and will feature the term’s most popular posts.  While there will be several criteria to help us decide which posts “win” the honor of being published in our journal, one of the criteria will be the amount of conversation generated by the post.  So if you really like what someone has to say, please leave a comment indicating your approval.

So check back next Monday (I promise…I will publish the post by MONDAY!) for a game-changing piece from HAPS President-Elect, Terry Thompson.  I can tell you that her post really is game-changing, because when she sent me the draft 2 weeks ago, it immediately changed my game.  What fun!

Interested in composing a blog post or two?  Contact Communication Committee Chair Wendy Riggs (wriggs@hapsconnect.org) for more information.

HAPS Web 6- A Message From Your HAPS-Ed Team!

The HAPS-EDucator is a great way to share ideas!
The HAPS-EDucator is a great way to share ideas!

This week, the Communications Committee brings you a message from the co-editors of the HAPS EDucator, Jennelle Malcos and Sarah Cooper.

You may have read the post a couple weeks ago focusing on the HAPS EDucator and all the exciting resources it has to offer.  We would like to now share with you some information about how you can share your ideas and contribute to this resource.  Submitting an article is easy to do with out new “Author Submission Packet” posted on the HAPS EDucator website.

The goal of the EDucator is to foster the advancement of A&P education by promoting communication and collaboration between HAPS members – also known as sharing your ideas!  You may be wondering what types of articles are considered for publications.  There are many types and vary from innovative teaching techniques or lesson plans, reviews of trending topics in A&P or summaries of noteworthy events or experiences.  We also feature our popular Edu-Snippets:  quick and easy ideas to use in the classroom or lab.  We encourage you to think outside the box and publish in areas that interest and excite you because they will likely excite others.

Starting in 2014, regular article submissions are now undergoing a peer-review process based on the standards of “Educational Scholarship”.  If you submit an article, 2-4 members of the HAPS EDucator Editorial Board will review your article based on the following criteria:

  1.  Is the article appropriate and relevant for HAPS members and the society’s goal of promoting excellence in human anatomy and physiology teaching?
  2.  Is the article scientifically accurate and reflects the author’s preparation and knowledge in the field?
  3.  Is the presented information organized and free form spelling and grammatical errors?

You will receive targeted feedback and the opportunity to make corrections if necessary.  Through this process, published articles are considered peer-reviewed and can be used for the purposes of promotion and tenure at your institute.

After the annual conference we also look for members to share their experiences in the “HAPS EDucator Annual Conference Edition”.  We encourage workshop and poster presenters to share a summary of their work or attendees to share there favorite part of the conference.  This becomes a valuable resource for those that cannot make the journey to the annual conference.

Submitting an article is a great way to contribute to HAPS and help promote your career.  If you ever have any questions about the submission process, please feel free to contact us at haps-ed@hapsconnect.org.  Now take a break from reading this blog and start sharing your ideas!

Your Co-Editors,

Jennelle Malcos and Sarah Cooper

HAPSweb 3: Anatomical Sciences Education (ASE)

AAA_journalDid you know that HAPS members have free access to the bimonthly publication from the American Association of Anatomists?

Anatomical Sciences Education is published in cooperation with the American Association of Clinical Anatomists and the Human Anatomy & Physiology Society. Their website describes the journal as providing “…an international forum for the exchange of ideas, opinions, innovations and research on topics related to education in the anatomical sciences of gross anatomy, embryology, histology, and neurosciences at all levels of anatomical sciences education including, undergraduate, graduate, post-graduate, allied health, medical (both allopathic and osteopathic), and dental.”

There are some directions HAPS members must follow to access this journal online.  These steps are described on the HAPS website.  First, click on the “Resources” menu on hapsweb.org and select “Teaching Resources.”  Here you’ll see a giant list of things available to members and non-members and if you scroll down to the very bottom, you’ll see a  handful of outside HAPS-related resources.  One of these is a link to the Life Science Teaching Resource Community, which was discussed on this blog during spring 2014.  But the next item on the list is a link to ASE.

Now, you have to be a member and enter your login information before you can access the next page, but if you are a member, you will be taken to a website with clear instructions for how to take advantage of your free online access to ASE.

So have you accessed ASE through HAPS?  Take the poll and let us know!

25- HAPS and Social Media

I am the chair of the HAPS Communication Committee (affectionately known as the HAPS ComCom).  Our committee’s task is to promote HAPS via social media.  This is a really interesting task.  HAPS currently has active accounts on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+.  We are exploring Instagram as well.

Wow...there are a lot of ways to share your thoughts via social media.  But who's listening?
Wow…there are a lot of ways to share your thoughts via social media. But who’s listening?

But when I think about all the possible social media outlets, it is easy to become overwhelmed.  How can we increase our audience?  And how many HAPSters participate in social media anyway?  It actually became a rather amusing quest for me at the annual conference in May to find HAPSters who tweet…let me just say tweeting HAPSters were few and far between.  Thankfully, we did find Sarah Balizan, (also known as the HAPS Twitter Queen), who’s doing an inspirational job of keeping the HAPS Twitter account active.

Right now, and for the next couple of weeks, we will be engaged in a bit of a social media experiment with the Anatomia Italiana crew while they are on their exciting Italian field trip starting this week.  Team leader Kevin Petti has generously agreed to provide us with lots of social media fodder to share.  He will be writing posts for this blog, as well as doing daily updates via Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.  Our Communications Committee is mobilized to re-tweet, favorite, and otherwise share his Italian updates.   I’m excited to see if our team can generate some increased interest in our social media presence.

So I’m curious.  How do HAPSters use social media?  Are you interested in following Anatomia Italiana around Italy?  Do you tweet?  Do you use Facebook?  Have you explored Google+ or LinkedIn?

So weigh in on this poll and follow the hype for the next couple of weeks.  Then let us know what you think.  In the meantime, happy communicating!